Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Should a Blind Person Have a Right to Carry a Gun

In my newsfeed I saw this story about Michael Barber, a resident of Iowa and also a senior officer of the National Federation of the Blind in Iowa.

The story discusses Barber's recent purchase of a gun and his successful application to carry a firearm

In the past I have handled firearms. In England I was a regular shooter at several clay pigeon shooting grounds and quite a proficient shot with a shotgun, on one occasion I achieved a perfect 100 score on a skeet shooting round. Of course at that time I had perfect vision.

Since coming to the United States I have visited a local shooting range for instruction in shooting a handgun and did some target practice achieving a score of 90/100 and that only using the guidance of my instructor to aim and fire as the target, though visible to me was a dark blurr.

I do not however carry a gun. For me it is merely a matter of personal choice. I would not know how to maintain a gun safely, with a myriad of small parts it would be a  nightmare just trying to keep it in good working order.

I do however feel that Mr. Barber is doing a good thing in that he is publicizing a positive aspect of blindness. That is blindness does not mean that we are unable to enjoy the rights granted to us in the United States.

Mr. Barber also comments in the report that he is waiting for a car that will allow the blind to drive. I too am eagerly awaiting that piece of hardware too. I would love to drive again. The motor industry is very close to creating  the vehicle, but it is legislation that insists that a licensed and sighted person be behind the wheel when the vehicle is in operation.

Do you think that our legislators of today might be as far seeing as the Founding Fathers and allow the blind driver to drive assistive technology equipped cars on the public road. The Founding Fathers never said "All except the blind can carry arms."

You can read the full story at The Des Moines Register Website.